SYNERGISE
visits Sicily in Italy











Places
Articles
Writers
Contributors



John Gregan

WEBMASTERS - click to find out how to appear here!




Synergise INSTANT
Car Hire Quote




EUROPE > Italy > Sicily

Sicily — History Encapsulated

John Gregan

Article & Pictures © 2010 John Gregan

T/T #118
FreeStyle 8.8
Feature Article

Page copy protected against web site content infringement by Copyscape


the feeling that you are part of a remake of the Godfather is hard to avoid as ALL the men look like they are from Central Casting, Mafiosi section.


One of the many temples at Selinunte, SicilyI hate to say this but Sicily is the most honest part of Italy I have ever visited. It may be that the Mafia have decided to follow the tourist dollar but there is none of the annoying little lapses such as not returning your change or the extra items on your bill that are so annoying elsewhere. Speaking of the Mafia, there was no sign of them at all except for a wonderful stretch of modern motorway going, on stilts, from nowhere to nowhere and unconnected to the existing road network. At the same time, the feeling that you are part of a remake of the Godfather is hard to avoid as ALL the men look like they are from Central Casting, Mafiosi section.

Trapini street - SicilyWe arrived in Trapani thanks to Ryanair and were immediately struck by how un-European it looked. It looked and felt more like North African. The same dun coloured houses with windows shuttered and a closed look about them. Really a bit too third world. But things improve as you get closer to the city.

There is not a lot to keep you in Trapani, which is a working port and services the Egidi Islands, which have become a big tourist venue. It has a nice historical centre with a few Palazzos and Churches but nothing too major. The public transport system works well and the train services connect you to the rest of the island so you can get out and explore.

The joy of Sicily is that you have World History from 1,000 BC through Greece, Phoenicia Carthage Rome Norman and Hapsburg periods all mixed in together and, often, in the same place. And they have all left their remains, in some cases like the Punic Walls of Erice, in a very big way. This perfectly preserved village is just a long cable car journey from Trapani, perched right on top of the Monte Carnara with a view on a clear day from Italy in the North to Cap Bon in the south. It has been inhabited for at least 5 millennia and as well as having the aforementioned gigantic Cyclopedian Walls, which are worth the visit on their own, they have the original Grotto of the Goddess Venus. This goes back to when she was just a local fertility goddess. She did however have a particular cult with a line in beautiful sacred prostitutes which proved to be very popular with the passing sailors. This unique selling point, as well as the fact that the grotto was easily found (being on top of a very tall isolated mountain that could be seen from a long way out to sea), helped this local girl to make the move to the Big Time. After only a couple of thousand years of business, she was transferred to Rome. The rest is history.

Sicily abounds in spectacular archaeological sites which are little known and less advertised. For example, the Park at Selinunte contains the remains of the largest temple ever built in Classical times (see above picture). Bet you didn’t know that. A Parthenon, bigger than the one in Athens, hardly gets a mention and a town (admittedly ruined) but on the scale of Knossos is also tucked away there. And to get to it you have to pass through Castelvetrano which is reputed to be the home of the capo di capi of… you know who.

The most important thing in Sicily, though, is the food. The locals are interested in it and will talk about it for long periods before eating it for long periods and in huge quantities. The great collection of historical influences from Arab to Europe has produced a cuisine which is wonderfully subtle and yet satisfying. The sea is the great provider but the land also supplies its bounty. Pesto alla Trapanese is worth trying with the local version of pasta called Busiate.

General verdict on Sicily is Well worth a visit. And a Return visit. And you can't say more then that.

See also: Sicilia: Through the Eyes of a Child by Stewart Collins.

See also the article: Sicilian Vespers by Nicky Gardner.

WATCH A
RELATED VIDEO

click for video

Click the camcorder symbol above to watch a video related to this destination.

Best of Sicily.com
A guide to Sicilian travel and all things Sicilian. Strong on maps.

GOLD

sicilia.indettaglio.it
A site about Sicily and Sicilian people. Very detailed destination guides with good pictures.
GOLD

If you enjoyed reading the above article then you will probably also enjoy Haridwar by John Gregan, and Mallorca, also in Europe, and our latest articles covering the Orinoco Delta, La Mata, Marbella and Beijing.



Sandman
Ian Kingsley
A gripping psychological thriller with characters that reach out and grab you. Sandman touches our primary emotions: jealousy, love, fear, hatred, and grief. The dialogue is authentic, and, along with the scene-painting narrative, youíll feel like youíre on the beach witnessing the unfolding action.

book cover image



 
The Playgroup
Janey Fraser
With an opportunity to prove herself, Gemma can't wait to take over Puddleducks Playgroup. But the new head of the infant school, Joe Balls, soon tempers her enjoyment. Meanwhile, Nancy is in turmoil. Her only son has just started at the playgroup and her husband has taken a temporary posting to Vietnam. There never was much hope of conceiving her much-wanted second child so what is she to do now? A tumultuous term lies ahead for all.
book cover image



 
Dead Men
Richard Pierce
Birdie Bowers, an infamously secretive painter, is a woman given a dead manís name by her obsessed parents. Her namesake was one of Scottís companions on his fated expedition to the Antarctic. Almost a hundred years after his death, she is determined to discover what really happened to him accompanied by Adam, a bored computer geek, who falls in love with her. But Scottís tent is now under 30 metres of ice.
book cover image



 
1,000 Places to See Before You Die
Patricia Schultz
This hefty volume reminds vacationers that hot tourist spots are small percentage of what's worth seeing out there. Its scope is from beaches to museums to cathedrals to bustling markets, grand hotels to backwater inns, rugged safaris to the most pampering spas.

book cover image



Publishers & Authors - Find out about guaranteed visibility in our Departure Lounge Bookshop
Please note that book covers may vary from those shown above


Your linking text here
Click Here!

Page C1118